:: Volume 13, Issue 1 (5-2011) ::
2011, 13(1): 67-73 Back to browse issues page
Investigation of Effect of one Session Moderate and Heavy Resistance Exercise on Acute and Delayed Responses of Leptin, Insulin, Cortisol, Testosterone and 24- Hour Energy Expenditure in Healthy Men
Zohreh Taher , Mohammadreza Hamedinia Dr, Amirhosein Haghighi Dr
, z_taher25@yahoo.com
Abstract:   (32454 Views)

Introduction: The aim of this experimental, cross-sectional study was to investigate the effect of one session of moderate and heavy resistance exercise on the acute and delayed responses of leptin, insulin, cortisol, testosterone and 24-hour energy expenditure in healthy men. Materials and Methods: Thirteen healthy men (age 37.5yr, body mass index 26.40kg/m2, body fat 22.46%) randomly participated in three exercise groups, the moderate resistance exercise (MR, 3 sets × 10 repetitions at 70 % 1 repetition maximum (1RM)), the heavy resistance exercise (HR, 3 sets × 10 repetitions at 80 % 1RM) and the controls(C). Blood samples were taken (after overnight fasting) before and immediately after exercise and after 4 and 9 hours of recovery. Serum leptin, insulin, cortisol and testosterone concentrations were measured using ELISA methods. Results: After adjusting for percentage changes of plasma volume, serum leptin reduced immediately after exercise and control sessions but returned to primary levels after 9 hours of recovery (p<0.05). Immediately after exercise and control sessions, serum cortisol and testosterone decreased and serum insulin increased. No significant change was seen in 24-hour energy expenditure after MR and HR protocols. Conclusion: To conclude there were no meaningful acute and delayed effects of moderate and heavy resistance exercise on serum leptin, insulin, cortisol, testosterone and 24- hours' energy expenditure in healthy men.

Keywords: Leptin, Energy Expenditure, Resistance Exercise
Full-Text [PDF 273 kb]   (2929 Downloads)    
Type of Study: Original | Subject: Exercise
Received: 2010/01/11


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Volume 13, Issue 1 (5-2011) Back to browse issues page