:: Volume 22, Issue 4 (12-2020) ::
2020, 22(4): 295-304 Back to browse issues page
Interactions between Weight Change and Fruit and Vegetable Intake in the Incidence of Metabolic Syndrome: The Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study
Somayeh Hosseinpour-Niazi , Bahar Bakhshi , Parvin Mirmiran , Fereidoun Azizi
Nutrition and Endocrine Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran, Department of Clinical Nutrition and Dietetics, Faculty of Nutrition Sciences and Food Technology, National Nutrition and Food Technology Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran , mirmiran@endocrine.ac.ir
Abstract:   (2065 Views)
Introduction: This study aimed to investigate the interactions of weight change and fruit and vegetable intake with the incidence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) among adults. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted within the framework of the Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study (TLGS) among 1915 adults during 8.9 years of follow-up. Dietary data were assessed using the food frequency questionnaire. Anthropometric, biochemical, and body weight data were measured at baseline and during the follow-up. MetS was defined according to the adult treatment panel III. The association between fruit and vegetable intake and MetS by adjusting weight was assessed using Cox regression analysis. Results: The median intake of fruit, vegetables, and both fruit and vegetables was 3.5 (IQR: 2.0-5.5), 3.1 (IQR: 1.9-5.9), and 6.9 (IQR: 4.0-7.8) servings per day, respectively. The intake of both fruit and vegetables was significantly and inversely associated with the MetS incidence after controlling for the confounders (hazard ratio: 0.73; 95% CI: 0.66-0.87). No significant association was found between the intake of fruit and vegetables and the risk of MetS. Based on the results, in participants with weight change less than 7%, the intake of fruit and vegetables and the intake of both fruit and vegetables reduced the risk of MetS. However, no association was observed among participants with weight gain more than 7% during the follow-up. Conclusion: Weight change modifies the association between fruit and vegetable intake and the risk of MetS.
Keywords: Fruit, Vegetable, Metabolic syndrome, Weight change
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Type of Study: Original | Subject: Nutrition
Received: 2020/05/17 | Accepted: 2020/11/8 | Published: 2020/12/2


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Volume 22, Issue 4 (12-2020) Back to browse issues page